Discover Your Happy Place

So. Its been a while. Figured it was time to get back on the blog train, whoo whoo!

IMG_2317

 

What have I been doing? Actually, so much, that I kind of forgot to write about it. Sometimes it feels a struggle between experiencing the present moment, being fully IN it, and then reflecting on it enough to write about it. You know what I mean?

After a few months at home in New Zealand finding my feet and checking in with myself, practicing Thai Massage on the unsuspecting residents of Nelson and at summer festivals, I was ready to be on the move again, and returned to Thailand to run our third Whole & Happy Retreat at Faasai Resort & Spa. My time at home was a little bit of “what the f**k am I doing with my life? Should I just get a normal job with a steady income and a house and a car and a wardrobe and nice facial creams? Is it time to grow up?” Ehhh. What does that even mean? Prescribing to a well-worn life template? Plenty of time for that later. In the meantime, lets get weird!

Inevitably, after about two months at home, all I could think about was the possibility and the potential of the unknown, of where these retreats could take me if I put my all into them, invested my whole heart. I figured, if I’m going to do this, I’m going to do it 100% or not at all. And baby steps, but all steps in the right direction. Tash and I slowly started expanding our network, finding new eco-conscious locations to host retreats, places in alignment with our values, surrounding ourselves with the people that build us up, and constantly reminding ourselves of the little wins rather than the huge picture, because sometimes when I think about that I have to go and have a little lie down. But, good to have goals, right?

 

IMG_2382

It’s one of these things where I don’t fully believe how I came to be doing this, because it’s everything I dreamed of about 4 years ago. I actually remember drawing a picture of “my dream job” and it incorporated yoga, massage, being outside, eating good food, meeting like-minded people, being challenged and inspired on a regular basis, and somehow deep down that projection of what I wanted my life to look like started to come into fruition, without ever making a conscious decision to go in that direction. I just kept going towards the things that make me happy, and I found myself here. In my happy place. Physically, I’m in Austria right now, working at MoaAlm Mountain Retreat in the Alps, doing yoga and hiking, eating wholesome food, meeting inspiring people, and emotionally I’m in my happy place, so it’s something that is constantly evolving, and it’s what we want people to discover on our retreats. What their happy place FEELS like.

IMG_2282

This past 6 months has been a real whirlwind, with Tash and I getting clearer and clearer on our vision with Whole & Happy Retreat, what our mission is, and what is important to us as things get bigger and better. We have expanded to two more locations in Thailand and in Portugal, and we are undergoing the transformative process of rebranding and redesigning our website to allow for some pretty awesome things in the future.

What are we creating? Read on, kids.

KULA: Sanskrit

1. Community of the heart

2. A group coming together of its own free will; an intentional community

3. Family.

Kind Partnerships

We partner with eco-resorts around the world making positive change for the environment and the communities in which they reside. By partnering with local people and off-the-beaten-track places, our guests can feel good about spending a week devoted to themselves, because they are also devoting themselves to a greater good.  When we fill our own cup, we have plenty of overflow for the people and places around us, and on a Whole & Happy Retreat that overflow is directed towards the environment and a forward thinking community. The way we spend our money is a vote – so we vote for goodness.

04FFBBF1-44F5-428D-990E-24A61B264575

Retreats

Our retreats are structured around our 5 integral ingredients for a Whole & Happy lifestyle, and we spend our lives testing out this recipe so that you are guaranteed a transformational experience with us. Through much (positively exhausting) research, we have discovered our “non-negotiables” for a happy, whole life, and they come together as a whole to make you happier.

Intuitively, we all know the things that make us feel good, but life gets in the way and tells us that there is no time for lying in the grass and noticing the heat of the sun on our closed eyelids. Hustle! Achieve! More! Faster! This is what structures our life when we forget to take the time to notice. What could possibly be more important than being present? After all, this moment is ultimately all we have. Why not enjoy it?

IMG_2265

 Surrender.

“Be peaceful, be happy, be whole”

To the present moment, to the breath, to the experience, to the process, to the challenges and to the help that comes your way. By surrendering from the fight, the hustle, the constant striving for something bigger or better, we allow the good stuff to come our way, instead of chasing it down. It’ll come, if you trust the process. We practice restorative yoga and surrender to the support of the earth, recognising that there is nowhere else we need to be, and nothing else we have to do.

IMG_1985

Gratitude.

“Practicing smiling is like planting the seed of a mighty redwood. The body receives the smile, and contentment grows. Before you know it, you’re smiling all the time.” 

We manifest an attitude of abundance, because when we have an abundance mindset, we recognise all the beautiful things we have to be grateful for, however tiny they may be. We make a list of 50 things that make us happy – once we get started, that list starts to blow up to 100, 200+ things that we are grateful for. When you really think about it, there are so many tiny things in our day that we gloss over when we focus on the bigger picture. Lets bring it back to the small stuff – crisp white sheets, that first sip of coffee in the morning, the feel of soft carpet under your feet, when your favourite song comes on the radio, when a shaft of sunlight peeks through the curtains. We take this attitude of gratitude off our morning mat and into the day, moving through the motions with more mindfulness.

IMG_2380

Nature. 

“In every walk with nature, we receive more than we seek.”

Let’s return to nature, where we came from and where we belong. By immersing ourselves in nature, we remove the disconnect between our actions and their impact on our waterways, the earth beneath our feet, the other living beings that exist alongside us.

We remove our egocentric beliefs around our existence, that the world revolves around us. We recognise the impact of our surroundings on our mood – grey skies and rain turning us inward to ourselves, curling into a cosy introspective ball, and bright sunshine feeding us energy and enthusiasm for activity. We visit waterfalls, we plant trees, we walk barefoot on the warm rocks, we practice yoga to the sunrise and meditate into the sunset. We recognise the transience and impermanence of the sky and the rain and the sunshine and the life of living things, and we become less attached to the future or the past, simply enjoying the present as it is.

IMG_2372

Self Love.

My whole teaching is this: Accept yourself, celebrate yourself, love yourself”. (Osho) 

Ohh, you pretty thing. Yes, you. If you feel like you are waiting for your body and your appearance to change before you can truly be happy, stop waiting now. We believe the key to self love and unconditional acceptance of yourself comes from a recognition of the strength and capability of your physical body as a vessel to who you are on the inside. Rather than focussing on the lack, shift your mindset to the abundance. Maybe your legs are short, but they are strong and they support you even if you don’t support them with your thoughts. Maybe your belly isn’t flat, but it is the home of your emotions, where you digest your food and your experiences, and it is literally the centre of your being. Recognise all the things your body does for you, without you even having to ask.

Throughout Whole & Happy Retreats, we write letters to ourselves and spend time in silence to become comfortable with our thoughts and to truly observe our inner dialogue. The way we talk to ourselves has an actual, tangible effect on our physiology and our biomechanics. Talk to your body the way that you would talk to your best friend, or your child. Focus on strength, not weakness. Kindness over critique. And you’ll be amazed at how you transform. You start to glow, to radiate positivity and kindness. Nothing is more attractive than a smile.

Connection. 

“No need to read your mind, when your soul speaks the same language as mine”

By opening up about our own challenges and being vulnerable about our story, we open up a safe space for the people around us to do the same, and this is the beauty of retreat. We never know why a particular group are brought together on retreat, but we know there’s a reason. We learn from each others life experiences, we open up about our path that brought us here, we feel safe to try new things in our yoga practice and in our life when we are supported by the people around us. There’s something undeniably special about a Whole & Happy Retreat, a feeling of family and inter-connectedness, a kindness and gentle compassion amongst retreaters. We feel it, and you will too.

Connection on Whole & Happy Retreat means to connect with the people around us, but it also means to connect with ourselves through morning silence, through practice on the mat, through noticing our tendencies and our habits, what makes us the happiest. It means connection with our environment, recognising our actions and their impact on our natural world. It means understanding that we are not alone, that everything and everyone is interconnected.

 

Playfulness. 

“The body heals with play, the mind heals with laughter and the spirit heals with joy.” 

Laughter is the best medicine, and we all know it intuitively, but sometimes life gets a little too busy and we take everything too seriously, until we realise days have passed and we haven’t laughed. To laugh is to be truly present! Nothing like a good knee-slapping giggle with friends to get you out of your head and back into the room, and this is a core ingredient for our Whole & Happy Retreats. By bringing together people from around the world with similar passions and dreams, and a healthy sense of humour, we create one  big positive community. We play games and write stories, we play with partner yoga, we let out our inner child in spontaneous dance parties and we tell stories around the bonfire. When we play our barriers break down and we are most authentically ourselves, and nothing is more beautiful than that.

And that’s that. You can read more about us and our retreats below, and follow me on Instagram for slightly more regular updates….

And really start to think about it – how can you discover your happy place?

15039505_848558093530_5509261857630147256_o

RADIANCE Portugal: 6-10th and 13-17th September

BALANCE Thailand: 3-9th November

KARMA Thailand 23-29th November

Visit our website to find out more

Email Us

Follow us on Instagram

Like us on Facebook

 

Home.

Well. I’m home in New Zealand, but not without great effort. I booked my flights home in a frantic interval between Laos internet failures, and ended up booking the wrong flight altogether, leaving me with two days less than I planned in Melbourne, a whirlwind yoga workshop and friend catchups, 4am wake up calls and a 12 hour layover in Kuala Lumpur Airport overnight. Pat on the back for Rosie! Life is nothing if not a messy adventure, right?

img_0936

Arriving in Kuala Lumpur, after wandering aimlessly for an hour, trying to find a spot to rest my head, I discovered just the spot for me.  I slept under a staircase on my overused, dubiously stained yoga mat with a security barrier propped up to conceal me, looking like a wayward homeless person. I used my scarf to cover me, popped my eye mask on  and jammed my earplugs in, one hand clasping my backpack and one hand trying not to touch the ground in fear of germs. I had to move a large pot plant to get into this wee nook but it was definitely the best seat in the house.

Wearing hiking shoes and long black tights tucked into my hiking socks to try and stay warm in the freezing cold air conditioning, I rested assured that nobody would come over and try to snuggle up next to me in my hiding spot, because I really did not look all that appealing. Adoring my body was a large thin beige jumper (the warmest thing I owned in Asia), a floral mandala sarong, a flower scrunchie and a look of confusion and exhaustion on my face. Probably even as I slept.

15235554_10100131546701749_5550046890282241805_o
Life in technicolour

Finally I made it onto the plane, where I promptly realised I was travelling budget style on Air Asia – they don’t even give you a glass of water… Luckily I had smuggled some peanuts on board, and I splashed out on a bottle of water to prevent severe dehydration. Two small asian women were wedged in next to me, both of whom had some small digestive problems, sneezing and belching their way through the 8 hour flight to Melbourne, but they offered me a chewy sweet thing to eat so I felt fondly toward them. Every time my neighbour burped, she would cover her mouth with her hand and gasp as if in astonishment that her body was capable of such a thing!

Shortly after lift-off, the “Happy Birthday” song came on the loud-speaker. It wasn’t clear whose birthday it was, so everyone clapped in time for a while, then trailed off awkwardly and looked around the cabin, tucked their hands underneath them and retreated into their little airplane bubbles. It was a nice communal airplane moment.

When I arrived in Melbourne, my friends met me at the airport, and one of the first things they said to me was “we have wine and cheese!” These are true friends. I shed a tear or two. Wine and cheese are two things that I love dearly and that are not readily available or of high quality in Southeast Asia. The perks of the western world.

img_0986
My first taste of Flat White goodness

I have returned  home with the same sense of wonder that I left with several years ago, except this time I’m curious about my own country, all the things that I always took for granted now call me home with a new appeal. I’m curious about how a different version of me can integrate back into the place that reminds of everything I’ve come from.

img_1009
En route to NZ

Ahh, home. Family gatherings, barbecues, beach walks, hill walks, swimming in the river, drinking good wine, eating local produce, visiting the Saturday markets, the smell of the earth when it starts to rain, hot days and cool nights, wearing a warm jumper, sunrises, sunsets, cooking in my own kitchen with music on, late nights in the beer garden.

This incredible Southeast Asia adventure has left me with a much desired sense of balance in my life, after a long period of swaying from side to side, pretty happy, but slightly off centre (who am I kidding, I will always be slightly off-centre….I am a Gemini, after all).

img_1014
Nelson Harbour

Whilst working and living in Europe I went from extreme to extreme – from partying hard in Irish pubs, staying up all night socialising, laughing my arse off, meeting some incredible, adventurous, kind people and being a social butterfly, but never quite feeling my healthiest version of me, and sometimes sacrificing my physical health and the important components of self care for the ‘craic’. I never seemed to be able to nail the balance between living freely and looking after me.

IMG_2837

20140813-214601-78361817.jpg

So then, at the end of each Irish season I would run off to work on a yoga retreat, a farm in the middle of nowhere, or a vegan wellness centre where there was nothing unhealthy or distracting to lead me astray from my devoted practices. I would spend several months being very healthy, practicing yoga, learning about a holistic and alternative lifestyle, how to make amazing vegetarian food, barely drinking anything, creating natural beauty products and learning how to grow medicinal plants. I would go for bush walks and do sun salutations each morning and develop a radiant glow by moving my body and avoiding all stimulants and toxins. It was an all or nothing lifestyle, one that experienced both fully but couldn’t exist side by side.

IMG_1877

_20140506_1506
Brenazet, France

I loved both parts of my life, and spending time in one made me look forward to the other, but I started to feel that these two sides of me couldn’t be reconciled – how can I be a social butterfly who likes to drink a wine, eat cheese, and stay out all night dancing, but also live mindfully, starting each day with yoga, wondering about the world and nature, getting to know my body and how much sleep and what kind of food it needs, reading about people doing inspiring things and wanting to live a big, full life?

After completing a yoga teacher training in Spain and living a pure life for six weeks, then promptly spending one month travelling around the UK with a group of heavy- drinking dudes watching the Rugby World Cup, I’d never felt more unbalanced and confused about which was more “me”. I was making decisions and doing things that felt a little incongruous with my values, but I wasn’t too sure yet what my values were.

IMG_1294

The discovery that life doesn’t have to be all or nothing to be real and purposeful was a lesson I was only ready to learn here in Asia. Before this I was too busy immersing myself completely in the two different sides of myself, one at a time, getting to know what I liked and what I didn’t like. I like the Irish because they are great craic, they are social humans just like me. But I didn’t like how I felt physically after the long seasons in Ireland – too much partying, not enough self care.

I loved working on retreats in Europe and immersing myself in yoga and wellbeing, educating myself on all of the tools I had at my fingertips to heal and improve myself. I met some lovely people, and I also met people who I felt had taken this lifestyle so far that they were at a point of obsession, they couldn’t forgive themselves if they slipped up, they had alienated themselves from much of the community around them because of their unforgiving and rigid attitude to health and what was “the right thing to do/ be/wear /say/eat”. I found myself taking what I wanted and what resonated with me, and leaving the rest. It’s necessary to be disciplined, but I always find that people who are too disciplined are not actually that fun… And that’s just not my cup of tea.

IMG_0860.JPG

Can we be fun, and focused? Can we be a wee bit wild, but with a sense of  purpose? Can we find the point inside of ourselves that is balanced and content, no matter the environment or the situation?

Coincidentally, post- Rugby World Cup, at my point of great confusion, was when I got an opportunity out of the blue to move to Cambodia for a yoga teaching job. The universe provides the answers, because this was without a doubt the best decision I ever made, but it was also one of the hardest. Leave the comforts of western life and take the plunge by travelling alone to a foreign third world country? Ahhhh sure. For many people, going to Southeast Asia might seem like running away from real life, but for me, it felt like running towards it. It was a move that I made with absolutely no knowledge or expectation, I only knew I had to do it, because if I didn’t, I would be stuck in a cycle of partying and purifying, without understanding of the centre in which I belonged.

15039505_848558093530_5509261857630147256_o

Asia gave me a lot of gifts. Unconditional, open smiles, that don’t ask for anything except maybe a smile back. Generosity and kindness, a curiosity, a willingness to help. Confidence that I’m on the right track. It’s the place that taught me I don’t have to fit into a neat little box, in fact, I’m much more interesting if I just go wildly and messily in the direction of my dreams, staying open to the possibility and the potential of each situation, whether good or bad.

I learnt the art of balance in my life, because people came into my world who are just like me – they believe that life should be lived fully and not just in sections, and they believe that each little piece of life can build a big beautiful mosaic of colour and vibrancy, that each complements the next, and you can’t be quite whole if you deny yourself of one piece. You will always feel the lack, the sense of imbalance, if something is missing.

img_0974

img_0555

I discovered the things that are important to me and perhaps to everyone, if we dig deep;

Friends – Family – Laughter – Purpose – Love – Indulgences – Challenge – Connection and Community – Kindness  – Spontaneity & Wildness – Art – Creativity – Nature

img_0946

I worked in places in Asia that were immersive yoga retreats but that attracted people who were just like me. Travelling, exploring, curious, but not quite ready to commit to any one part of themselves just yet.  I tried to be very open about the fact that even though I was teaching them, I was learning as well, and I really didn’t have all the answers, but I did have a sense of humour about the physical hilarities of yoga and I managed to laugh at myself when I mispronounced things in front of 30 humans, saying things like “shit your hips” instead of “shift your hips” then everyone collapsing into giggles. I’ve always felt that people who don’t take themselves seriously are the best kind of people, so I shall always try to maintain this in my life.

81

I would work hard all week, then on my day in between retreats I would relax by the pool, have a glass of wine, eat what my body was demanding (vegan or very not vegan), sleep many hours, go dancing, whatever I wanted. The lifestyle demanded balance between putting energy out there for others, then bringing it back to myself. If I wasn’t looking after myself, I was no good to anyone else, so self care became a huge priority. I had the realisation that self care could take a lot of different forms. Some days it meant doing yoga, meditating, eating well, and sleeping 8 hours, but other days it meant skipping evening meditation to cycle down the dusty roads at sunset with my best friend and eat coconut pancakes and laugh our faces off. Sometimes it meant standing up for myself. Sometimes it meant surrendering, backing down and retreating. It meant not attaching to any of these things as “the right way to take care of myself”, but rather detaching from the idea of right and wrong, and moving intuitively from day to day.

79

IMG_1582

When you arrive home from a long time away, its very easy to fall back into habits and mindsets that you thought you had left behind.  I resisted doing any yoga for my first few days at home because it just felt incongruous with my surroundings. I was resisting change. I lost my balance. I felt on edge and overwhelmed and I didn’t manage to maintain my usual sunny disposition. Maybe no-one else noticed, but I did.

It is different to be home. It’s cold, it smells like trees and river, there are different pressures on my time, I have to keep appointments and dates to meet people, its all very confusing and busy and fast.  There are many varieties of cheese to choose from, there are old friends and new friends, there is family, there are boxes in the garage of shit that I forgot existed, waiting to be opened and unpacked. People have different priorities and responsibilities. I kind of feel like a sham, like the wayward traveller who has returned home but doesn’t quite slot back in, and perhaps thats because I don’t want to, deep down, because I don’t want to let go of my last few years and surrender to this. But being here doesn’t discount where I was before.

rosie

The way through this transition for me is all about staying true to the things that make me feel like myself. I can create adventures here, just like I did overseas.  I can surround myself with inspiring people. I can meet people on mountain tops and talk about travel as if I’m a foreigner too, and feel a little sense of smugness when I remember that actually, I belong here.

img_1017

This morning I woke up, pulled on some long leggings, socks, a thermal top, made a cup of tea and lay out my mat on our balcony, looking out over the garden and up at the hill behind our house, the centre of  New Zealand, and I did a practice that was no different, no more challenging, no more profound than it has been in Asia or in Europe, but it felt so, so different. Maybe because its about 20 degrees colder here, maybe because there are many more layers separating me and my mat, maybe because after my practice I go and drink a cup of coffee with my mum, and two worlds collide.

So now I am slowly surrendering to the idea that I can be anywhere in the world, in any situation or environment, and I can be sad or happy or excited or nervous, I can be beginning a day of introversion or interaction, it doesn’t matter – I can always come back to that little calm place at my centre, untouched by people or places or feelings. And when I’m in that place, I cannot be swayed in either direction. This is where I find my balance.

Home is where the heart is, and right now my heart is, officially, home.

img_0894

Head to my website or Facebook Page for details on upcoming summer yoga classes in Nelson, and Thai Massage offers.

Facebook: Rosie Glow Yoga

Website

treatyo-self-2.png

The Cleaning Fairy

Have you ever wondered how your rubbish bin comes to be miraculously empty every morning? How the coffee stains on your desk are just magic-ed away overnight?

IT’S ME GUYS!

I am the cleaning fairy.

My current selection of employment for my money-making summer includes a cafe and specialty foods shop, a catering company and a cleaning franchise. I have my finger in all pies, which guarantees regular income and versatility, which is fabulous for people who get bored easily like myself.

Cleaning is perhaps not the most glamorous of occupations, but it is top notch for those days when you don’t particularly want to talk to people or make an effort with your appearance. I scrape my hair back into a wee alfalfa, pop on my large blue cleaning shirt and black pants, fill my drink bottle, strap on my strap-on vacuum cleaner (yup, I do that), and I’m away!

In general, I find that unappealing situations in life can become far more appealing, when one is willing to laugh at oneself.

For example, when I am down on hands and knees in a kindergarten scraping play dough off the carpet with a piece of lego, with a hefty hoover bumping me on the back of the head, I like to think, “I wonder what I look like from behind right now?”

Or when I am vacuuming in a classroom and the vacuum cleaner lead gets tangled in a chair and the chair falls off the desk which creates a domino effect on all the other chairs in the room, and I rush around trying to put them all up again only to remember I am still wearing the vacuum cleaner, it has been following me, and I have created a labyrinth of vacuum lead which I must retrace or forever remain entangled in its sucky embrace. It would be a horrible end.

Or when I am bent over, hoovering under a desk intently, when the kindergarten parrot begins to sing a serenade, and wolf whistle until I straighten up and give him a reprimanding look, as if to say, “you cheeky parrot, you”. I’ll be honest with you, its the most attention I get these days, and I am beginning to look forward to our meetings. Love you Paz.

I think the worst is when there are ACTUAL HUMANS in the room when these things happen. In general it is just middle-aged women marking school papers, but every now and then the sexual physical education teacher turns up, and I just can’t look him in the eye when I’m wearing a vacuum cleaner backpack with straps around my waist, and a very Rosie-glow sheen in the face.

I have a lot of time to think, so sometimes I entertain fantasies of myself arriving at the school as a teacher, and Mr PE teacher is a cleaner, and the tables are TURNED, and I have the power, and I make him vacuum everywhere while I watch. I’ll show him physical education! Pah!

Sometimes I think I have too much time to think, which is when I start listening to podcasts, about a vast variety of things. Aliens, Murder, Gardening, Films, Politics (But not really cos I just don’t quite care enough), Food (which just makes me hungry and certainly consider taking an apple from the kindergarten fruit bowl), Travel, Things I Didn’t Know Which I Should, Things I Think I Know But Actually I’m Wrong, Superfoods and Why Are They Super (Indeed!)…. The list goes on.

It is a bit of a skill to take work that people may look down upon (quite literally, when I am under the desk), and turn it into an opportunity for humour, education, and a perspective on life from a different standpoint.

Next time you sharpen your pencil onto the floor, take a little moment to thank your cleaning fairies.

We know whats in your rubbish bin. Wink Wink.

Recipe: Green Fritters

Is it breakfast, lunch or dinner? I’ll let you decide.

We ate these on a particularly sweaty summers evening in the back garden, accompanied by buckwheat cabbage salad, homemade sundried tomato hummus, sweetcorn and a cheeky glass of Neudorf Pinot Noir.

I have a confession to make –  it’s definitely not my own recipe. I have nabbed it and adapted it from a book my lovely aunt in England gave me, titled “A Modern Way to Eat”, which is written by a woman living in London with excellent taste in food. Thankyou, kind lady, for this delight.

I used greens from the garden – silver beet, kale, and courgette, with a lemon from the lemon tree. I’m lucky enough to be at home in Nelson where Mother has a glorious vegetable garden. You can use whatever you have to hand – spinach, broccoli, peas, etc. The idea is that its a quick and easy recipe to throw together, using whats available. Also, cheese is important (but when is cheese not important, amiright?)

I’m sure I’m not alone in saying they never quite turn out how they look in the book… but they taste real good. That is all that matters.

Here goes:

 

Green Fritters

250g courgettes (grated or finely chopped)

2 handfuls greens, shredded (spinach, kale, silverbeet, whatever you like)

4 tbsp soft cheese (feta, goats cheese)

25 g grated parmesan or pecorino

1 clove of garlic, peeled and finely chopped

5 free range eggs

wee bit of basil/mint/dill/parsley

squeeze of a lemon

sea salt and cracked pepper

olive oil or coconut oil (for frying)

photo 1

Put all the vegetables in a big bowl, crumble in the cheeses, add the garlic, herbs and lemon with a generous amount of salt and pepper. Crack in the eggs and mix it well.

Get a large frying pan, a generous amount of oil and a medium-high heat. Spoon in the mixture, flatten to form patties, fry for 2-3 minutes then flip and fry on the other side until brown.

Serve with whatever you want to serve it with, and a hearty glass of wine/beersie/lemonade/typical summer beverage.

Bask in your culinary glory.

Tramping with Rosie.

There are pros and cons to being a casual employee…

A con is that there are less dollaz.

A pro is that I can take mid-week hiking excursions to little huts in the back arse of nowhere!

Mother, cousin and I took a wee jaunt to Fenella Hut in the Kahurangi National Park this week.

Besides the mass onslaught of blood sucking sand flies who love my juicy ankles, it was quite lovely. It was like a Boy Scouts adventure trail, with little cabins and campfires dotted along the valley floor, close enough to the river for a good dip after a long day.

Our first night we just drove into the first hut and slept fitfully, fearful of exposing our toes to the savage insects who roamed the cabin, waiting to pounce.

The days walk was meant to take almost five hours, but because we are youthful and spritely, we trotted along the track and jogged up the hill, doing a few squats while we were at it.

When we arrived at Fenella Hut, it was like a shimmering mirage of glory in the midday heat. A relatively new hut, Fenella Hut was built as a memorial to Fenella Druce, who was killed in 1977 when the Three Johns Hut was blown over a bluff in Aoraki National Park.

We hoped the same would not happen to us.

A high point was the toilet, which may have been the most magnificient Department of Conservation hut toilet I have ever graced with my bottom. And I have graced MANY.

Stained glass windows, a delightful bush view (ha!) and even a pipe of running water conveniently placed for washing ones hands post wee-wee. It’s the little things that count.

Usually you have to dash in, hold your breath, close your eyes and pretend that the flies buzzing out of the dark depths of the long drop are just there for moral support.

An equally high point (some may say higher) was the magical tarn (lake) that rested just over the hillock, beckoning us with it’s un-tarn-ished beauty. I hope you see what I did there.

If trees had eyes, (and fingers and mouths), they would have been laughing and pointing at our naked, awkwardly tanned bodies plunging ungraciously into the waters. I do not like to touch the bottom with my feet, because I fear the creatures of the depths, but I enjoyed doggy paddling about, watching the dragonflies have sex with their faces (at least that’s what it looked like. Isn’t nature wonderful??).

Then came the time to get out. Naked. Using only a slimy rock, fatigued legs and stylishness, I slid on my front up the rock, realised my companions were taking x-rated photographs of my exit technique, slid back a bit in shock horror, then launched myself upward like a nifty seal. It was that rock’s lucky day… Just sayin’.

My evening meal consisted of mothers homemade dehydrated lentil curry, which sounds quite hideous but actually was top notch, and a snack on Rachel’s ‘fun mix’. Open to interpretation.

We had the hut to ourselves, so we played card games loudly and used two mattresses instead of one. Crazy cats.

Today we retraced our steps in a gazelle-like fashion, stopping for water, an occasional nibble and a cheeky skinny dip in the river, much to the astonishment of the German tourists walking by. (Just kidding, no one saw us… We think).

Now I am home, sprawled on my bed with a glass of wine positioned very nearby for ease of access to my mouth.

I DESERVE IT. It’s been a hard week at work..

IMG_1294.JPG

IMG_1291.JPG

IMG_1292.JPG

Christmas Holidays, New Zealand Style

Its all been a bit quiet here for a while… Yours truly has been busy flying home from Europe, catching up with friends, and adjusting back into having a normal job in peaceful, sunny Nelson.

Having been away for 18 months, coming back to Nelson was a bit of a shock to the system initially – everything seemed to be in high definition, without the grey skies and smog of a lot of European cities. Even when the sun shines in Ireland, it never seems to be quite as bright as here. I spent my first couple of weeks soaking up the long daylight hours, doing quite a lot of sleeping and working most days to boost the ol’ bank account. My mum, my brother and I also did a hike in the Nelson Lakes which was a nice wee family bonding time.

Christmas was at home in Nelson, where we all wore matching elephant pants and santa hats (christmas present from my brother, recently returned from work in South-East Asia), and I was lucky enough to receive a camera from him aswell, obviously to document the spectacle. We ate outside in the sun and went for a swim in the river to work off the excess consumption.

There’s been a healthy dose of holiday time over Christmas and New Years, which we spent in Wanaka at a lovely bach, with adventure on our door step. (I did quite a lot of time lolling about in the pool, trying to SUP on a boogie board and playing amateur water volleyball with the others.. there were a few bikini malfunctions).

On the drive down we stopped overnight at Birdsong Backpackers in Hokitika, on the wild West Coast. I can definitely recommend it if you’re passing through, and its quite different to some of the hostels I stayed at in Europe – probably because it’s family run and a bit more personal. We had a little unit to ourselves with a kitchen, bathroom and outdoor area, and upstairs in the communal area there is another big kitchen and dining room, overlooking the sea. Jeananne and I felt we should maintain some attempt at health and wellbeing on our holiday, so we went for an evening jog into the town and down to the beach, with a detour to the Glow Worm Dell (sadly it was too light to see any wormies).

The next day we continued on to Wanaka to our delightful house in town, with a pool, spa, big front lawn and spacious living area. I slept on the floor in a swag, (we ended up having more people than beds), which I was a bit apprehensive about but actually I think it was the best deal. I could sleep with the door open on hot nights, and I basically had a double bed to sprawl about in. I just feel sorry for the early risers in the house who had to wake me from my slumber.

We went cycling, walking, hiking, swimming, yoga-ing, drinking, eating, luging (on our day trip to Wanaka and Arrowtown) and wine and cheese tasting, so I feel it was a healthy balance of indulgence and exertion. Very different from the holidays in the UK, where the weather is usually too cold and miserable to leave the house for very long.

On the way home we stopped in Kumara, a tiny gold mining town, and spent the night at The Theatre Royal Hotel which was furnished with antiques (and very comfy beds). We had a delightful meal of locally sourced goods and consumed several beverages, before retiring to our grand rooms, just like the good old days…

On our last day we stopped in Punakaiki to check out the pancake rocks and the blowholes (teehee).

It’s nice to be a tourist in my own country – I’m sure a lot of tourists have seen more of New Zealand than I have!

Happy New Year! I hope your 2015 is filled with adventure.

IMG_3091.JPG

IMG_3102-0.JPG

IMG_3085-0.JPG

 

IMG_3136.JPG

IMG_3158.JPG